Editing Russ Python Tips and Techniques

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* when division by 0 is useful
 
* when division by 0 is useful
 
* code is multiple files - scratch file
 
* code is multiple files - scratch file
 +
* msg, print( msg )
 
* moving to 3.6 use fstrings
 
* moving to 3.6 use fstrings
 
* example files with functions  [[Python Example Code]]
 
* example files with functions  [[Python Example Code]]
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* dict based case statements
 
* dict based case statements
 
* choose names for cut and paste
 
* choose names for cut and paste
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* spyder using comments for navigation
 
* mark your code with unusual string  * zzz in your code  
 
* mark your code with unusual string  * zzz in your code  
 
+
* make your names searchable
  
 
=== Move these to a good place in the outline ===
 
=== Move these to a good place in the outline ===
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If you do not see an easy way to do this with names use a comment.  Using zzzz.... is a short term way of doing this.
 
If you do not see an easy way to do this with names use a comment.  Using zzzz.... is a short term way of doing this.
 
==== Dict Based Case Statements ====
 
 
 
Python does not have a case statement, but it does have if....elif which can be used and is only a little more verbose.  However if you have more than a few cases it can be cumbersome.  Using a dict gives a very compact and fast case statement.  Suppose you want to have a case statement based on strings:
 
 
 
<pre>
 
    # set up, ideally only done onece, perhaps at module or class level
 
    dispatch_dict  = { "one":    print_one,
 
                        "two":    print_two,
 
                        "three":  print_three,
 
                        }
 
 
    # set a case for an example call:
 
    key = "two"
 
 
    # the slightly verbose case statement
 
    function      = dispatch_dict[ key ]
 
    function()
 
</pre>
 
  
 
= Parameters for Applications =
 
= Parameters for Applications =

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