Editing Popular Parts

Jump to navigation Jump to search

Warning: The database has been locked for maintenance, so you will not be able to save your edits right now. You may wish to copy and paste your text into a text file and save it for later.

The system administrator who locked it offered this explanation: restoring Database, Access will be restored shortly

The edit can be undone. Please check the comparison below to verify that this is what you want to do, and then save the changes below to finish undoing the edit.

Latest revision Your text
Line 1: Line 1:
With so many different parts available, it can be hard to figure out which component to use. Taking a look at what others regularly use might make this process easier.
+
Another new page by [[russ_hensel]], not much more than a stub now.  Feel free to join in with your recommendations.
  
 +
== Popular ==
 +
 +
So many parts, so many variations, which to pick.  Why not try to see what is popular:
 +
 +
*[http://eeshop.unl.edu/storlist.html The Big List These are the parts the EE Shop keeps in stock to sell to students.]  UNL likes them why not us?
 +
*[http://ocw.mit.edu/OcwWeb/Electrical-Engineering-and-Computer-Science/6-301Solid-State-CircuitsSpring2003/Tools/ This section contains circuit examples from commercial products and datasheets of transistors which are studied in this course. ] If MIT studdies them, maybe they are worth looking at.
 +
*[http://www.edn.com/archives/1995/052595/11dfcov.htm Choosing an op amp: it's no longer a trying task] The oldies in particular may be good, but not expensive parts.
 +
*[http://www.voti.nl/swp/ Starting with PICmicro controllers] See the Selecting a PIC Section
 +
 +
== Kits and Projects ==
 +
If you are working from a kit or a published project consider getting extras of the parts.  If you use them once you may use them again.  Also the authors of these things tend to know and pick what is popular.  Always think about; it there are parts that are exceptions that you would never use again.
 +
 +
==If you are working with X then Y where Y will help you find the popular parts==
 
Note that links may or may not be to the best source.  Look around, add a link if you find a better one.  Do not delete a link, unless product is gone for good.
 
Note that links may or may not be to the best source.  Look around, add a link if you find a better one.  Do not delete a link, unless product is gone for good.
  
== Kits and Projects ==
+
===X=PIC's===
If you're working from a kit or published project consider getting extras of the parts.  The authors of these things tend to know, and pick, what's popular.  If you use them once you may use them again; there are exceptions, though.
 
  
== PICs ==
 
 
Because PICs are mostly digital logic, if you use PICs you will need most of the stuff in the [[Popular Parts#X=Digital Logic]] section as well as stuff in this section.
 
Because PICs are mostly digital logic, if you use PICs you will need most of the stuff in the [[Popular Parts#X=Digital Logic]] section as well as stuff in this section.
  
Line 68: Line 79:
 
|
 
|
 
10K
 
10K
<!----------------------------->
 
 
 
|-valign="top"
 
|
 
Generally Useful Chips
 
|
 
 
*[http://chiphacker.com/questions/2320/what-are-the-best-useful-variety-ics-to-have-around-for-pic-microcontrollers What are the best useful variety IC’s to have around for PIC Microcontrollers?] from ChipHacker
 
|
 
na
 
 
<!----------------------------->
 
<!----------------------------->
  
 
<!--      -->
 
<!--      -->
 
 
 
 
 
 
|-valign="top"
 
|-valign="top"
 
|Op Amp
 
|Op Amp
Line 170: Line 165:
 
|}
 
|}
  
== Op Amps ==
+
===X=Op Amps===
 +
 
 
{| class="wikitable"
 
{| class="wikitable"
 
|-valign="top"
 
|-valign="top"
Line 211: Line 207:
 
|-valign="top"
 
|-valign="top"
 
|diodes
 
|diodes
|When you need current one way, not the other. See [[Transistors, Diodes, etc.]] for details.
+
|When you need current one way, not the other.
 
|
 
|
 
* ''(FIXME: isn't this already too many? Trim.)''
 
* ''(FIXME: isn't this already too many? Trim.)''
* MBRA140 (1 A DC forward; 40 V reverse) SMT for [[Reverse Protection Diodes]]
+
* MBRA140 for [[Reverse Protection Diodes]]
 
* 1N914 (300 mA DC forward; 75 V DC reverse)
 
* 1N914 (300 mA DC forward; 75 V DC reverse)
* 1N4148 (0.2 A DC forward; 100 V reverse) TH glass
+
* 1N4148
* 1N5711 (0.015 A forward; 70 V reverse) TH glass Schottkey diode
+
* 1N5711 Schottkey diode
* 1N5817 (1 A DC forward; 20 V reverse) TH Schottkey diode TH $0.15
+
* 1N5817 Schottkey diode
* BAT48 Schottkey diode (0.35 A DC forward; 40 V reverse)
+
* BAT48 Schottkey diode
* BAT85 Schottkey diode (0.20 A DC forward; 30 V reverse)
+
* BAT85 Schottkey diode
* 1N5406 (1N5408 is better) (3 A DC forward; 600 V reverse) TH $0.25
 
* 1N4001 (1N4007 is better) (1 A DC forward; 50 V reverse) TH $0.10
 
* 1N1188 (1N1189A is better) (35 A DC forward; 400 V reverse) threaded stud ($5.00 Newark 2010)
 
* 40EPF12PBF (40 A DC forward, 1200 V reverse) ($3.50 Newark 2010)
 
  
 
<!----------------------------->
 
<!----------------------------->
Line 267: Line 259:
 
|}
 
|}
  
== Digital Logic ==
+
===X=Digital Logic===
 +
 
 
If you use any microcontroller, you will probably also need most of the stuff in this section.
 
If you use any microcontroller, you will probably also need most of the stuff in this section.
  
Line 294: Line 287:
 
* If you use a microcontroller in your project, the counters inside that microcontroller will probably be all the counters you need.
 
* If you use a microcontroller in your project, the counters inside that microcontroller will probably be all the counters you need.
  
|
+
|?
*?
 
  
 
<!----------------------------->
 
<!----------------------------->
  
 
|-valign="top"
 
|-valign="top"
 +
|Shift registers
 +
 
|
 
|
Shift registers
 
|
 
Often used to expand the number of ports.
 
 
|
 
|
 
*?
 
*?
* 74HC595 -- for more output pins. SIPO eight bit shift register with output latch. Perfect for letting the propeller clock [[POV display]] slowly clock in the next value, then LOAD them all at once. Near the bottom of the page describing the [http://www.robotroom.com/Tach.html "Digital Numeric LED Displays Tachometer (RPMs), Temperature, and Counter"] project, David Cook says: "The 595 is a great 8-bit serial chip because data can be shifted in without affecting the existing output. All new data is then switched over at the same time. The 595 can also be daisy chained. In this case, 48 outputs are controlled with only three wires (data, clock, and latch)."
+
* 74HC595 eight bit shift register with output latch. SIPO. Perfect for letting the propeller clock [[POV display]] slowly clock in the next value, then LOAD them all at once. Near the bottom of the page describing the [http://www.robotroom.com/Tach.html "Digital Numeric LED Displays Tachometer (RPMs), Temperature, and Counter"] project, David Cook says: "The 595 is a great 8-bit serial chip because data can be shifted in without affecting the existing output. All new data is then switched over at the same time. The 595 can also be daisy chained. In this case, 48 outputs are controlled with only three wires (data, clock, and latch)."
* 74HC166 -- for more input pins. PISO 8-bit parallel-load shift registers.
+
* 74HC166 - 8-bit parallel-load shift registers -- PISO.
* 74HC165 -- for more input pins. PISO 8-bit parallel-load shift registers.
+
 
  
 +
|-valign="top"
 +
|Shift registers
  
 +
|
 +
Often used to expand the number of ports, I need a bit more research here.
 +
|
 +
* 74HC595 -- for more output pins
 +
* 74HC165 -- for more input pins
 
<!----------------------------->
 
<!----------------------------->
  
Line 336: Line 334:
 
*.01 uf
 
*.01 uf
 
<!----------------------------->
 
<!----------------------------->
 
|-valign="top"
 
|
 
decoupling capacitors.
 
|
 
"I can only recall using less than 1uF decoupling cap in one circuit in the last 8 or so years ... 100nF bypass caps [0.1 uF bypass caps] are so 1990s.  If someone tells you that should be the standard value, you should be careful about what other bad or outdated advice they may be dispensing." -- [http://massmind.org/techref/postbot.asp?by=thread&id=%5BEE%5D+1%2E0+uF+Decoupling+Cap+%2D+A+Must%3F&w=body&tgt=post one post in the PICList Thread (EE) "1.0 uF Decoupling Cap - A Must?"] by Olin
 
|
 
* 1uF through-hole caps for solderless breadboard
 
* 1uF 0805 ceramic caps for [[dead bug style]] prototyping and custom PCBs
 
  
 
<!-----------------------------
 
<!-----------------------------
Line 373: Line 362:
  
 
|}
 
|}
 
 
== Electric Motors ==
 
See [[motor driver]] for details.
 
 
transistor
 
 
"my favorite International Rectifier FU5505 power MOSFET transistor"
 
-- [http://www.robotroom.com/DualFan.html David Cook]
 
 
== External Links ==
 
*[http://eeshop.unl.edu/storlist.html The Big List These are the parts the EE Shop keeps in stock to sell to students.]  UNL likes them why not us?
 
*[http://ocw.mit.edu/OcwWeb/Electrical-Engineering-and-Computer-Science/6-301Solid-State-CircuitsSpring2003/Tools/ This section contains circuit examples from commercial products and datasheets of transistors which are studied in this course. ] If MIT studies them, maybe they are worth looking at.
 
*[http://www.edn.com/archives/1995/052595/11dfcov.htm Choosing an op amp: it's no longer a trying task] The oldies in particular may be good, but not expensive parts.
 
*[http://www.voti.nl/swp/ Starting with PICmicro controllers] See the Selecting a PIC Section
 
* [http://dorkbotpdx.org/wiki/recommended_parts_parts_store DorkbotPDX: Recommended Parts]
 
* John C Luciani Jr. answers [http://wiblocks.luciani.org/FAQ/faq-parts-list.html "What parts would you recommend stocking?"]
 
* [http://www.ladyada.net/wiki/partselector Partfinder from ladyAda]
 
* [http://dangerousprototypes.com/docs/Partlist] Dangerous Prototypes' list of common parts
 
  
 
[[Category:Components]]
 
[[Category:Components]]

Please note that all contributions to OpenCircuits may be edited, altered, or removed by other contributors. If you do not want your writing to be edited mercilessly, then do not submit it here.
You are also promising us that you wrote this yourself, or copied it from a public domain or similar free resource (see OpenCircuits:Copyrights for details). Do not submit copyrighted work without permission!

Cancel Editing help (opens in new window)